Ecuador

Ecuador's Amazon rainforest contains some of the planet's most bio-diverse ecosystems and are home to thousands of indigenous peoples who have lived there for millennia. Below the surface of this fragile jungle also lay reserves of crude oil and natural gas, the ever-growing demand for which threatens the environment and the indigenous communities that inhabit it. More

Showing articles 1 - 10 of 1405 total  |  Page 1 of 141

Drilling Towards Disaster: Ecuador's Aggressive Amazonian Oil Push

Drilling Towards Disaster: Ecuador's Aggressive Amazonian Oil Push

April 6, 2016

Last week, the Ecuadorian government announced that it had begun constructing the first of a planned 276 wells, ten drilling platforms, and multiple related pipelines and production facilities in the ITT oil field, known as Block 43, which overlaps Yasuní National Park in Ecuador's Amazon rainforest.

Ecuador Drills for Oil on Edge of Pristine Rainforest in Yasuní

Ecuador Drills for Oil on Edge of Pristine Rainforest in Yasuní

First of 200 wells drilled close to controversial block of forest known to have two of the last tribes living in isolation

April 4, 2016The Guardian

"By drilling Yasuní-ITT, the Ecuadorian government is threatening to destroy one of the most biodiverse and culturally fragile treasures on the planet for what amounts to about a week of global oil supply," said Amazon Watch's director, Leila Salazar-Lopez.

A Journey to the Front Lines of Ecuador’s Next Oil Battle

A Journey to the Front Lines of Ecuador’s Next Oil Battle

March 30, 2016

"In the rainforest, everything is possible. Here are our pharmacies. Here are our libraries. Here is our treasure, our life. Not only for us, for the entire world. So our future generations, your children, your children's children, can live and breathe clean air."

Indigenous Women Unite to Defend the Amazon, Mother Earth and Climate Justice

Indigenous Women Unite to Defend the Amazon, Mother Earth and Climate Justice

March 24, 2016

I am filled with hope by the alliance of indigenous Amazonian women who came together in a historic march in defense of the Amazon, Mother Earth and Climate Justice on International Women's Day. It was the first time ever that indigenous Amazonian women from seven nationalities joined forces and marched together in defense of their rights, rainforests and future generations.

Amazon Watch School Curriculum

Amazon Watch School Curriculum

Spring 2016

As an organization that works to protect the rainforest and advance the rights of indigenous peoples in the Amazon Basin, we were thrilled when Kimberly Todd and Valerie Robert, two talented and socially conscious teachers, reached out to us with their curricula and resources for parents and students to take action. They created these unit plans with the goal of providing teachers with resources that meet both the English Common Core Standards and raise awareness about the threats facing the Amazon rainforest and the Indigenous populations living in the Amazon Basin.

Happy 20th Birthday, Amazon Watch!

Happy 20th Birthday, Amazon Watch!

March 11, 2016

Twenty years ago today, our founder Atossa Soltani stood face to face with Fernando Cardoso, then the president of Brazil. Atossa knew then that while indigenous peoples represent only four percent of the world's population, they are the guardians and stewards of 80 percent of the world's biodiversity. That's why she founded Amazon Watch on March 11th, 1996, to both protect the rainforest and advance the rights of indigenous peoples.

Amazon Watch: Protecting the Amazon by Advancing Indigenous Rights

Amazon Watch: Protecting the Amazon by Advancing Indigenous Rights

March 11, 2016

Amazon Watch works to protect the rainforest by advancing the rights of indigenous peoples. We work closely with indigenous leaders to help amplify the calls to keep the oil in the ground and stop mega-dams in the Amazon to avoid climate chaos. Defending indigenous rights, territories, living forests and flowing rivers are demonstrably effective solutions to climate change. Together, we are growing the movement to leave all fossil fuels in the ground and promote a just transition to 100% renewable energy.

Women of the Amazon Defend Their Homeland Against New Oil Contract on International Women's Day

Women of the Amazon Defend Their Homeland Against New Oil Contract on International Women's Day

March 8, 2016Ecowatch

"Women are the main victims [of oil extraction] – their ability to feed their families becomes impaired. There is deterioration of family health and they suffer the division of their communities and other forms of violence," women representatives of the Sapara and Shiwiar Nationalities and the Kichwa Kawsak Sacha and Sarayaku Peoples explained in a collective statement.

Over Five Hundred Indigenous Women of the Amazon and Allies March for Climate Justice, Indigenous Rights on International Women's Day

Over Five Hundred Indigenous Women of the Amazon and Allies March for Climate Justice, Indigenous Rights on International Women's Day

March 8, 2016

Puyo, Ecuador – In recognition of International Women's Day, Indigenous Amazonian women leaders of seven nationalities including: Andoa, Achuar, Kichwa, Shuar, Shiwiar, Sapara and Waorani nationalities and their international allies took action in Puyo, Ecuador, in a forum and march in defense of the Amazon, Mother Earth and for climate justice. Specifically, they came together to denounce a newly signed oil contract between the Ecuadorian government and Chinese oil corporation Andes Petroleum.

Stand with Amazonian Women!

Stand with Amazonian Women!

March 7, 2016

Tomorrow on #InternationalWomensDay hundreds of indigenous women from the Ecuadorian Amazon will march to protect nearly a million acres of their rainforest territory from an oil deal that Ecuador recently signed with Chinese state-owned oil company Andes Petroleum.

Showing articles 1 - 10 of 1405 total  |  Page 1 of 141

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