Colombia

Colombia's indigenous peoples continue to face grave threats in the era of the country's new President Juan Manual Santos. The struggle to control Colombia's lucrative natural resources has helped spur the country's decades-long civil war and is a central consideration of U.S. foreign policy for the region. More

Showing articles 1 - 10 of 422 total  |  Page 1 of 43

"We Own These Territories. Ecopetrol Has To Go."

"We Own These Territories. Ecopetrol Has To Go."

July 20, 2016

By entering and occupying the actual Gibraltar gas extraction site, the U'wa are taking their nonviolent direct action to a new level, even given the risks they run.

Indigenous Diplomacy

Indigenous Diplomacy

Colombia's U'wa Before the United Nations

May 19, 2016

"Today, I’m here sharing this with you but my people are once again mobilized. We are on Zizuma, the sacred mountain where many sources of water originate – lakes and rivers which bathe our territory and serve as an important source of water for Colombia."

The Legacy of Berito Cobaria

The Legacy of Berito Cobaria

On Cultural Genocide, Language Revitalization and the International Campaign Against Occidental Petroleum

May 10, 2016Intercontinental Cry

"Berito taught Colombia's indigenous people and the world the importance of the globalization of resistance, how to defend the beloved Earth and how to fight against climate change."

They Say the Land Is Dead, But It Lives Yet

They Say the Land Is Dead, But It Lives Yet

The U'wa Struggle Against Tuberculosis, Parasitic Worms, Climate Change and Threats of Violent Paramilitary Repression

May 5, 2016Intercontinental Cry

"These are very serious accusations providing a political rationale for a violent paramilitary repression against the U'wa," said Andrew Miller, Advocacy Director at Amazon Watch. "The notion that the U'wa are associated with an armed group is absurd. They are actually radical pacifists by culture."

The Guardians of Mother Earth

The Guardians of Mother Earth

The Indigenous U'wa Struggle for Peace in Colombia

May 2, 2016Intercontinental Cry

The U’wa, who call themselves the people who know how to think and speak, consider themselves the Guardians of Mother Nature, and large tracts of land inside their territory have become biological reserves for jaguars, spectacled bears, as well as a kaleidoscopic array of endemic plant and bird life that do not appear anywhere else on the planet.

U'wa Update: Serious Threats Against Peaceful Mobilization

U'wa Update: Serious Threats Against Peaceful Mobilization

March 28, 2016

There is no legitimate rationale for using violence against the U'wa. They are extreme pacifists by culture (considering the mere presence of weapons in their territory as violence) and have always been transparent about their actions. In this case, they are protecting an ecologically fragile and spiritually significant part of their own territory from damage.

Protecting Their Sacred Zizuma

Protecting Their Sacred Zizuma

Colombia’s U’wa Indigenous Guard Mobilizes

March 23, 2016

Taking direct action to defend their territory is a deadly serious proposition for Colombia's indigenous peoples. As such, the current mobilization of the U'wa Indigenous Guard to stop tourists from entering the sacred snow-capped mountain peak of El Cocuy has grabbed national and international attention.

Amazon Watch School Curriculum

Amazon Watch School Curriculum

Spring 2016

As an organization that works to protect the rainforest and advance the rights of indigenous peoples in the Amazon Basin, we were thrilled when Kimberly Todd and Valerie Robert, two talented and socially conscious teachers, reached out to us with their curricula and resources for parents and students to take action. They created these unit plans with the goal of providing teachers with resources that meet both the English Common Core Standards and raise awareness about the threats facing the Amazon rainforest and the Indigenous populations living in the Amazon Basin.

Happy 20th Birthday, Amazon Watch!

Happy 20th Birthday, Amazon Watch!

March 11, 2016

Twenty years ago today, our founder Atossa Soltani stood face to face with Fernando Cardoso, then the president of Brazil. Atossa knew then that while indigenous peoples represent only four percent of the world's population, they are the guardians and stewards of 80 percent of the world's biodiversity. That's why she founded Amazon Watch on March 11th, 1996, to both protect the rainforest and advance the rights of indigenous peoples.

Amazon Watch: Protecting the Amazon by Advancing Indigenous Rights

Amazon Watch: Protecting the Amazon by Advancing Indigenous Rights

March 11, 2016

Amazon Watch works to protect the rainforest by advancing the rights of indigenous peoples. We work closely with indigenous leaders to help amplify the calls to keep the oil in the ground and stop mega-dams in the Amazon to avoid climate chaos. Defending indigenous rights, territories, living forests and flowing rivers are demonstrably effective solutions to climate change. Together, we are growing the movement to leave all fossil fuels in the ground and promote a just transition to 100% renewable energy.

Showing articles 1 - 10 of 422 total  |  Page 1 of 43

Yes, I will donate to protect the Amazon!

"The work you do is vital, and I am happy to support it."
– Charlotte R. A.

DONATE NOW

Amazon Watch works to protect the rainforest by advancing the rights of indigenous peoples. Defending indigenous rights and territories is a demonstrably effective solution to the threat of climate change. Together with our indigenous allies, we are growing the movement to leave all fossil fuels in the ground and promote a just transition to 100% renewable energy.

DONATE TODAY

×