Brazil

Brazil's remote Amazon heartlands are currently threatened by intensive industrial development plans that include the creation of massive hydroelectric dams, natural gas and petroleum extraction projects, and industrial waterways to transport natural resources. More

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Belo Monte, Brazil: The Tribes Living in the Shadow of a Megadam

Next year the Belo Monte dam will flood vast swathes of Amazon rainforest. Indian tribes living on the river have lost their fight to halt the project – now they await the floods that threaten their entire way of life

December 16, 2014The Guardian

By the Great Bend of the Xingu river in the depths of Amazonia, the Juruna tribe is being drowned by what seems at first sight to be a flood of TV game-show prizes.

After Years of Decline, Deforestation in the Amazon Might Be on the Rise Again

After Years of Decline, Deforestation in the Amazon Might Be on the Rise Again

December 3, 2014VICE News

"Brazil has been on a path of trying to bring down deforestation a lot," said Maira Irigaray, Brazil program coordinator for Amazon Watch. "But when it comes to the Amazon, those numbers are still huge." Amazon Watch and other groups say Brazil's decision to roll back laws limiting the clear cutting of forests been behind the rise in deforestation.

Amazon Assembly Unifies Resistance to Dams on Brazil's Tapajós River

Historic gathering builds opposition to government's plans for new mega-dam complex

December 1, 2014

Santarém, Brazil – Tensions are building over the Brazilian government's polemic plans to circumvent the law in order to dam the Tapajós River. On November 27th, representatives of a diverse coalition of threatened indigenous peoples and other traditional communities assembled with religious leaders and activists to challenge a new Amazon mega-dam complex.

Resistance and Hope on the Tapajós River

Resistance and Hope on the Tapajós River

November 28, 2014

This week's "Caravan to Resist Dams in the Amazon" marked the largest political action ever staged in opposition to the Brazilian government's authoritarian march to dam the Tapajós River. Assembled on the banks of the majestic river, members the region's indigenous and traditional communities joined religious leaders and activists to stand as one in defense of the Tapajós, its peoples, and all the life that this vital waterway sustains.

Peaceful Warriors: The Mundurukú Resist Dams With Strength and Art

Peaceful Warriors: The Mundurukú Resist Dams With Strength and Art

November 27, 2014

Today some 60 Mundurukú people and 10 activists gathered at an island near the proposed São Luiz do Tapajós dam site in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, and performed an act of strength, dedication, and perseverance demonstrating their passion at any cost to save the Tapajós region.

Activists Join Indigenous People to Protest Construction of Amazon Mega-Dam

Activists Join Indigenous People to Protest Construction of Amazon Mega-Dam

Greenpeace join the Munduruku to protest against the construction of a hydroelectric project on Tapajós River in Pará state

November 27, 2014Greenpeace

Greenpeace activists joined the Munduruku deep in the Amazon rainforest to protest the construction of a major hydroelectric project. The group gathered at a beach on the banks of the Tapajos River and displayed a message in the sand that read "Free Tapajós". The beach is located near the waterfall of the "São Luiz do Tapajós" project, the first of five hydroelectric dams planned for the region.

Eye on Brazil: Tensions Escalate on the Tapajós River

Eye on Brazil: Tensions Escalate on the Tapajós River

November 25, 2014

The Brazilian government's decision to dam the Amazon's Tapajós River demonstrates a shocking disregard for the rights of the region's indigenous and traditional peoples. Tensions continue to escalate, with the Mundurukú people carrying out an "auto-demarcation" process of their land in defiance of the government's intentional deferral of the official demarcation process. 

Climate Change and the Importance of Indigenous Peoples in Seeking Solutions

Climate Change and the Importance of Indigenous Peoples in Seeking Solutions

November 19, 2014

"Today we are living through a key moment in history when we need to take action, and we need to take action now. The drought in São Paulo, for example, is not happening by chance. Even if no one is talking about it, this problem is directly connected to the destruction of the Amazon, where I live, because the standing forest regulates the cycle of rainfall. This is a clear example of how the destruction of the Amazon can affect the lives of you here in the big city."

A Dam Revival, Despite Risks

A Dam Revival, Despite Risks

Private Funding Brings a Boom in Hydropower, With High Costs

November 19, 2014New York Times

While some dams in the United States and Europe are being decommissioned, a dam-building boom is underway in developing countries. It is a shift from the 1990s, when amid concerns about environmental impacts and displaced people, multilateral lenders like the World Bank backed away from large hydroelectric power projects.

Latin America Moves Towards Decarbonising the Economy

November 17, 2014IPS

When the advances made towards curbing global warming are analysed in the first 12 days of December in Lima, during the 20th climate conference, Latin America will present some achievements, as well as the many challenges it faces in "decarbonising development".

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