Eye on the Amazon: The Official Blog of Amazon Watch

Amazonian Indigenous Women Mobilize for Life

October 25, 2013 | Leila Salazar-López

Women's Mobilization for Life

¡La selva se defiende! ¡La selva no se vende!
Defend the rainforest! Don't sell the rainforest!

Support Amazon Women!

Sign the petition to support the Women's Mobilization for Life and the Environment!

TAKE ACTION

For the last two weeks, these chants have echoed throughout Ecuador and are now echoing out around the globe. On October 10th, women from seven different indigenous nationalities (Kichwa, Waorani, Shiwiar, Shuar, Achuar, Andoa and Sápara) began gathering in the Amazon-port city of Puyo to embark upon a new journey, a journey for life. Two days later, over 100 women began a "Women's Mobilization for Life." They walked, marched, danced and caravanned from Puyo to the capital city of Quito in resistance to the Ecuadorian government's oil drilling plans in Yasuni-ITT and the southern-central Amazon. They traveled 250 kilometers from the Amazon to the Andes stopping in cities along the way including Baños, Latacunga and Ambato to call attention to their concerns and demands across the nation.

Read more »


Join Us at Bioneers This Weekend!

October 17, 2013

Bioneers

Are you headed to the 24th Annual Bioneers Conference this weekend? Be sure to catch up with Amazon Watch and our partners! We'll be speaking on the Main Stage, on panels, and we'll have a lively and informative booth outside.

Atossa Soltani – Amazon Watch Founder, Executive Director and 2013 Hillary Award Laureate for Climate Equity – and Leila Salazar-Lopez – our Program Director – will join other women leaders including Anna Lappé, Lynn Twist, Sally Ranney and Osprey Orielle Lake on panels at a conference entitled, Women as Democracy Builders and Mobilizing Women for Climate Solutions.

We are also honored that Franco Viteri, a Kichwa leader from Sarayaku and President of the Governing Body of First Nations of the Ecuadorian Amazon (GONOAE), will be joining us to share a Call from the Amazon and join indigenous allies in discussions in the acclaimed Bioneers Indigenous Forum, which features exciting workshops and discussions on major issues, struggles, and successes in Indian Country and in indigenous communities globally.

Read more »


Retaliation Trial Opens Against Victims of Chevron Contamination in Ecuador

October 15, 2013

Javier Piaguaje

It's Time to Fire Chevron's CEO!

Tell the Chevron board of directors to fire CEO John Watson. Since he took over, the company's bad behavior has only gotten worse.

TAKE ACTION

Today in New York Ecuadorian villagers from the Amazon rainforest region ravaged by Chevron's oil contamination were joined by supporters for a rally in Foley Square across from the courthouse where a trial opened in the California-based oil giant's retaliatory RICO lawsuit against the Ecuadorians and their U.S.-based legal advocates.

The Ecuadorians are representing 30,000 plaintiffs who won a landmark judgment against Chevron in an Ecuadorian court in 2011 in which the company was ordered to pay more than $18 billion for cleanup of widespread contamination, as well as compensatory and punitive damages. The case holding Chevron accountable for toxic dumping by its predecessor company, Texaco, has been upheld by appellate courts in Ecuador.

Read more »


Smooth Criminal: Chevron Sues Rainforest Communities It Contaminated

October 15, 2013 | Kevin Koenig

Who is the real criminal?

It's Time to Fire Chevron's CEO!

Tell the Chevron board of directors to fire CEO John Watson. Since he took over, the company's bad behavior has only gotten worse.

TAKE ACTION

The Gambino crime family. The Chicago outfit. The Latin Kings. You've probably heard of these infamous crime families, a.k.a., the mob. The mafia. "Don" Corleone. Capiche?

But have you heard of Hugo Camacho? Or Javier Piaguaje? They're not exactly household names. Nor gangster names for that matter. And that's because one is a campesino farmer that makes about $200 a month growing cacao. The other is a leader of the Secoya indigenous people, and both are from the rainforests of Ecuador's Amazon. Their crime? Suing the second largest oil company for the worst oil-related environmental disaster on the planet. And winning.

But starting today in a lower Manhattan courthouse, they are being accused of using the same criminal statute under which the big crime bosses of our time have been prosecuted: RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act). It's the latest in Chevron's scorched earth campaign to avoid paying a record environmental verdict against the company for massive contamination stemming from its operations in Ecuador's Amazon between 1964 and 1990.

Read more »


Belo Sun No!

Stop further tragedy on the Xingu River

October 10, 2013 | Christian Poirier

Belo Sun No!

Sign the petition to tell the Governor of Pará to deny Belo Sun a license for its destructive gold mine!

TAKE ACTION

This week Amazon Watch joined a global coalition of organizations to launch a campaign in defense of indigenous and traditional communities threatened by the Canadian mining company Belo Sun. The Toronto-based company plans to build Brazil's largest gold mine on the banks of the Amazon's Xingu River in the very area that is most impacted by the disastrous Belo Monte dam. Together with our partners in Brazil, Canada, the United States, and Europe, we are standing against Belo Sun's outrageous scheme to reap massive profits from the social and environmental havoc being caused by Belo Monte.

Aiming to extract tons of gold from the Xingu's "Big Bend" region, Belo Sun is swooping in like a scavenger, promising to heap further tragedy on local communities and a declining ecosystem. You can read more about Belo Sun's looming criminal intentions here.

Read more »


Current Highlights