Eye on the Amazon
  • Five Reasons To Be Hopeful for the Future of the Amazon

    Five Reasons To Be Hopeful for the Future of the Amazon

    December 28, 2015 – The Amazon rainforest can seem unimaginably vast. Similarly, the fight to defend it from the onslaught of industrial-scale threats like oil drilling, logging, and huge dams can appear overwhelming. But across the region, local indigenous peoples and our work to support them is making the difference and protecting the lands they have known for centuries. In 2015, these five snapshots of success gave us hope that the Amazon has a chance to avoid ecosystem collapse, but only if we support its indigenous guardians.

  • Solstice Reflections of Our Work at COP21 and Beyond

    Solstice Reflections of Our Work at COP21 and Beyond

    December 22, 2015 – As I reflect on our recent work at COP21 in Paris on the Winter Solstice, I am very proud of what we achieved and filled with great hope for our work ahead. The Amazon Watch team did an incredible job of accompanying and supporting a twelve-person delegation of indigenous leaders, women and youth from the Kichwa community of Sarayaku in the Ecuadorian Amazon and two Munduruku leaders from the Tapajós River Basin in the Brazilian Amazon to ensure the voices, concerns and solutions from indigenous peoples from the Amazon were heard by global leaders and media, and they were!

  • Our Generation Is the World's Voice for Climate Action

    Our Generation Is the World's Voice for Climate Action

    December 17, 2015 – I was among the Indigenous People from the Amazon Rainforest who made it to the COP21 climate summit in Paris. I felt it was my duty to be the voice of those who could not attend.

  • The Human Side of the Climate Change Equation

    The Human Side of the Climate Change Equation

    December 15, 2015 – While government officials inside COP21 conference rooms just outside Paris were reviewing the cost-benefit analyses of cutting down on emissions or debating the numerical semantics of the warming of the earth, the human side of climate change and environmental destruction took center stage just a few kilometers south at the Maison des Metallos on the weekend of December 5-6th.

  • "Where Our Government Kills, We Cultivate Life"

    "Where Our Government Kills, We Cultivate Life"

    Munduruku leaders bring their movement to Paris climate summit

    December 14, 2015 – At the closure of this year's critical COP21 summit in Paris, the most inspirational stories do not stem from official negotiations. They emanate from the heroic efforts of global indigenous movements, bringing a message of resilience and defiance from the front lines of climate change.

  • The Amazonian Tribespeople Who Sailed Down the Seine

    The Amazonian Tribespeople Who Sailed Down the Seine

    December 10, 2015 – The Kichwa tribe in the Sarayaku region of the Amazon in Ecuador believe in the 'living forest', where humans, animals and plants live in harmony. They are fighting oil companies who want to exploit their ancestral land. A delegation of indigenous people are at the Paris COP21 climate conference to make sure their voices are heard.

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