Showing articles 61 - 70 of 1566 total  |  Page 7 of 157

Which Chinese Corporations Have Their Eyes on the Amazon?

Which Chinese Corporations Have Their Eyes on the Amazon?

A Chinese business with a record of human rights violations wants to construct the São Luiz do Tapajós Dam, the biggest environmental controversy in Brazil since the Belo Monte dam

February 15, 2016Reporter Brasil

The implosion of Brazilian businesses with the Lava Jato corruption operation, the devaluing of the Real currency, and the rise in credit rates in Brazil have created an opportunity for Chinese businesses to establish greater participation in the country. Taking advantage of this situation, the China Three Gorges enterprise is preparing to make an offer on the licensing of the São Luiz do Tapajós dam project.

Oil Spill Causes a Disaster in the Amazon

Oil Spill Causes a Disaster in the Amazon

February 15, 2016El Comercio

Fish, vegetation and rivers are covered with black spots. According to estimates by Petroperu, about 3,000 barrels spilled into two sectors of Loreto and Amazonas. The spill has reached the Chiriaco River, a tributary of the Maranon, and the people of nearby communities are afraid to consume those waters.

The Solution To Climate Change That Has Nothing To Do With Cars or Coal

The Solution To Climate Change That Has Nothing To Do With Cars or Coal

February 11, 2016Washington Post

Tropical forests store the most carbon of all, and no tropical forest on Earth is bigger than the Amazon. It accounts for about half of all the carbon these forests store. But the Brazilian Amazon has lost nearly a fifth of its forest cover already – and the forest left behind also suffers because it is more fragmented and less continuous.

The High Price of Belo Monte and Modernization in the Life of the Muratu Indigenous Community

The High Price of Belo Monte and Modernization in the Life of the Muratu Indigenous Community

Formerly fishermen, now forced to become farmers, the Juruna indigenous community received new houses, electricity, and hen coops. But the electricity bill is unpayable, the river is drying up, and the mosquitoes are making life hell

February 9, 2016Xingu Vivo

The most drastic change in Bel's life was the obliteration of her ancestral identity and the imposition of a new identity when she was compelled to transform from a fisherwoman into a farmer.

Munduruku Building New Alliances To Fight Tapajós Basin Dams in Amazon

Munduruku Building New Alliances To Fight Tapajós Basin Dams in Amazon

A large indigenous group with a strong warrior tradition is doing modern organizing to confront the Brazilian government and block hydroelectric dams threatening their traditional lands

February 8, 2016Reporter Brasil

"They want to end the history of the Munduruku, but we won't let them," chief Juarez Saw declared. After every pronouncement, his listeners responded with a resounding shout: "Sawé!" – both a salutation and a war cry.

Oil Extraction Threatens To Expand Further into Ecuadorean Rainforest under New 20-Year Contract

The Ecuadorian government has signed two contracts with the China-based Andes Petroleum consortium, to work on the oil blocks known as 79 and 83; blocks that overlap with the territory of the Sápara indigenous people

February 3, 2016Mongabay

Indigenous leaders from across Ecuador have been coming together in recent years, as oil exploration has ramped up in the Amazon region where many of them live. Last week, they united once again to oppose yet another oil deal that, they say, threatens the existence of the ancestral communities living in the province of Pastaza, located in the easternmost Amazon region of Ecuador, about 300 kilometers southeast of Quito.

Small Tribe with a Big Voice Vows To Stop Chinese Oil Drilling in the Amazon

Small Tribe with a Big Voice Vows To Stop Chinese Oil Drilling in the Amazon

February 2, 2016Fusion

“We don’t want oil drilling in our lands,” said Manari Ushigua, one of the most well-known leaders of Ecuador’s tiny Zapara tribe. “Our culture is at risk of disappearing; so is our language and our way of relating to the rainforest.”

Deforestation Is Decreasing – Or Is It?

Deforestation Is Decreasing – Or Is It?

February 1, 2016GreenBiz

Experts say that recognizing the rights of local people and indigenous groups to their traditional forests could be one of the easiest, cheapest and most effective ways to protect standing forests from razing. Many indigenous groups still lack legal tenure to their traditional lands in tropical countries, but where they have secured their rights research often shows that forests are well protected.

In Santarém More Than 500 People Debate Dams, but the Brazilian Government Doesn't Send a Representative

Researchers, indigenous leaders, riverbank dwellers, federal lawyers, and social movements debate the problems with dams in the region

January 29, 2016Ministério Público Federal no Pará

So many people attended the hearing that in the beginning one group that couldn't manage to enter the public auditorium provoked a bit of a ruckus in response to the attempt to cancel or change the location of the hearing.

Controversial Ecuador Oil Deal Lets China Stake an $80-Million Claim to Pristine Amazon Rainforest

Controversial Ecuador Oil Deal Lets China Stake an $80-Million Claim to Pristine Amazon Rainforest

January 29, 2016Los Angeles Times

They tried talks. They tried letters. They tried protests. But nothing could stop the deal. Ecuador's government sold oil exploration rights in a remote corner of the Amazon rainforest to a consortium of Chinese state-owned oil companies this week, despite dogged resistance from indigenous groups in the South American country who fear they could lose everything.

Showing articles 61 - 70 of 1566 total  |  Page 7 of 157

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