Showing articles 1 - 10 of 1371 total  |  Page 1 of 138

Large Dams Just Aren't Worth the Cost

Large Dams Just Aren't Worth the Cost

Thayer Scudder, the world's leading authority on the impact of dams on poor people, has changed his mind about dams.

August 22, 2014New York Times

One reason this dynamic has been overlooked is that earlier studies evaluated dams' economic performance by considering whether international lenders like the World Bank recovered their loans – and in most cases, they did. But the economic impact on host countries was often debilitating.

Hydroelectric Power Damaging World Rivers, Study Shows

August 22, 2014Forbes

"State of the World's Rivers", an online interactive by International Rivers, illustrates just how dams have impacted rivers from the Mississippi to the Amazon, the Danube to the Yangtze.

Amazon Tribe Fights Brazil Dam Project

August 4, 2014BBC News

Over the last few months some 13,000 Munduruku have been protesting against government plans to build a series of hydroelectric dams that will flood part of their land on the upper reaches of the Tapajos river.

Brazil's Indigenous Tribes: The Low Cost Solution to Climate Change?

Traditional communities living in harmony with nature need greater support from governments, says report

July 28, 2014RTCC

Indigenous communities in Brazil may be the solution for preserving the Amazon rainforests and avoiding climate change, according to a new report.

To Fight Climate Change We Need to Protect the People Who Live in the Rainforest

July 25, 2014Motherboard

A new study by the World Resources Institute and Rights and Resources Initiative has concluded that f you put the woods in the care of people who know them the most intimately – the local communities and indigenous peoples who inhabit them – the woods will be safe.

Brazil Spends Billions on "Green" World Cup, but Does Little to Protect Environmentalists

Brazil Spends Billions on "Green" World Cup, but Does Little to Protect Environmentalists

South American nation holds the dubious distinction of having the highest number of murders of environmental activists

July 8, 2014Earth Island Journal

Brazil is today the most dangerous place in the world to be an environmental activist. By the end of Sunday's final match, an estimated 3.7 million people will have flocked to Brazil to support their home teams. And if statistics hold true, at least two Brazilian environmental activists will have been murdered over the course of the tournament.

Ecuador Planned Power Plant in Yasuni National Park, Documents Show

Ecuador Planned Power Plant in Yasuni National Park, Documents Show

Government appeared to be preparing plans at the same time as pursuing a high-profile scheme not to exploit the oil

July 2, 2014The Guardian

Ecuador's government was moving to install a power plant to exploit oil fields under the iconic Yasuni national park at the same time as pursuing a high-profile international scheme not to exploit the oil, according to government documents seen by the Guardian.

Cartoon Highlights Gibson Dunn's "Legal Thuggery" On Chevron's Behalf

Latest installment of satirical cartoon series calls out Chevron's threats against those who want to hold the oil giant accountable for the mess it made in the Amazon.

July 1, 2014MintPress

Created by Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist Mark Fiore, the satirical series was created to draw the public’s attention to the threats Chevron has leveled against environmentalists, journalists, scientists and locals who have tried to hold the company accountable for dumping 18 billion gallons of toxic oil waste into rivers and streams, spilling millions of gallons of crude oil, and abandoning hazardous waste in hundreds of unlined open-air pits littered throughout the Amazon region.

Brazil Suspends Belo Sun's Gold Mine Licence

Brazil Suspends Belo Sun's Gold Mine Licence

June 30, 2014The Globe and Mail

"Belo Sun has already shown they want to do the absolute minimum to receive their license to drill and it's encouraging that the federal courts have shown they are not going to let this slide," said Christian Poirier, an activist with the organization Amazon Watch. "Clarifying that you're going to use this much arsenic or dump that much slag by the Xingu River is not enough. If they say clearly what everyone knows is going to happen, do they get an environmental license in any case?"

Peru Now Has a "Licence to Kill" Environmental Protesters

Peru Now Has a "Licence to Kill" Environmental Protesters

Law exempts soldiers and police from criminal responsibility if they cause injuries or deaths

June 29, 2014The Guardian

“So far only protesters have been brought to trial,” said Amnesty International in a statement marking five years since the conflict and pointing out that human rights lawyers have said there is no serious evidence linking the accused to the crimes they are being prosecuted for – which include homicide and rebellion.

Showing articles 1 - 10 of 1371 total  |  Page 1 of 138

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