Showing articles 1 - 10 of 1405 total  |  Page 1 of 141

A Dam Revival, Despite Risks

A Dam Revival, Despite Risks

Private Funding Brings a Boom in Hydropower, With High Costs

November 19, 2014New York Times

While some dams in the United States and Europe are being decommissioned, a dam-building boom is underway in developing countries. It is a shift from the 1990s, when amid concerns about environmental impacts and displaced people, multilateral lenders like the World Bank backed away from large hydroelectric power projects.

Peru Activist Killings Condemned Ahead of Climate Talks

Peru Activist Killings Condemned Ahead of Climate Talks

November 17, 2014AFP

At least 57 environmental activists have been murdered in Peru since 2002, a rights group said Monday, criticizing the killings as the country prepares to host major UN climate talks.

Latin America Moves Towards Decarbonising the Economy

November 17, 2014IPS

When the advances made towards curbing global warming are analysed in the first 12 days of December in Lima, during the 20th climate conference, Latin America will present some achievements, as well as the many challenges it faces in "decarbonising development".

Brazilian Judge Sides with Tribe over Land Threatened by Dams

November 6, 2014Environment News Service

In a struggle between a Brazilian indigenous tribe and the federal government over two dams that would flood lands claimed by the tribe, a federal judge has ruled that the government must immediately publish its report delineating the tribe's territory that has been withheld for more than a year.

Brazilian Indians Marking Lands Themselves Due to Government’s Delay

November 6, 2014EFE

The Munduruku Indians have begun marking their ancestral lands in the Amazon region on their own, tired of waiting for the Brazilian government to get around to protecting the territory, indigenous sources said Thursday.

Brazil Pushes Amazon to the "Brink of the Abyss" Scientists Warn

Destruction of the Amazon rainforest has reached epic proportions under the leadership of Brazil's president Dilma Rousseff, who is celebrating her re-election this week. A new report warns that the ecosystem may be reaching a tipping point of no return.

November 4, 2014Digital Journal

A report from Brazil's Earth System Science Centre that draws on over 200 climate studies on the Amazon warns that the world's most important ecosystem is degrading to the point where it will not be able to draw enough moisture in to create the rain necessary to sustain it, the Guardian reported.

Guardians of Life: The Indigenous Women Fighting Oil Exploitation in the Amazon

Guardians of Life: The Indigenous Women Fighting Oil Exploitation in the Amazon

November 3, 2014The Washington Post

Felipe Jacome's set of photos Amazon: Guardians of Life documents the struggles of indigenous women defending the Ecuadoran Amazon through portraits combined with the powerful written testimonies.

Why the Result of Brazil's Elections Could Be Bad News For the Climate

October 31, 2014ThinkProgress

Rousseff is coupling her strategy of hydropower expansion in the Amazon with a heavier reliance on fossil fuels. Projects like Belo Monte are typical of Rousseff’s development strategy. Many other large scale infrastructure projects of high environmental impact and dubious utility are in the works, such as the diversion of the Sao Francisco River and the building of an East-West railway that will cut through stretches of the seriously threatened Atlantic Coast forest.

The Amazon Has Started to Malfunction, Brazilian Scientist Says

October 31, 2014Folha de S. Paulo

Twenty percent of the Amazon is deforested and another 20% is degraded. The Amazon rainforest has begun to fail its role in regulating the climate in South America, according to biochemist Antonio Nobre, of Brazil's National Institute for Space Research.

Meet the Amazon Tribespeople Who Beat Chevron in Court – but Are Still Fighting for Clean Water

Meet the Amazon Tribespeople Who Beat Chevron in Court – but Are Still Fighting for Clean Water

With the judgment in their favor tied up in a New York courtroom, indigenous residents of Ecuador's oil-polluted rainforest are going back to basics

October 30, 2014TakePart

"It fills me with rage to see what the oil companies have done to my people," says ClearWater coordinator Nemonte Nenquimo. "We are not supposed to be controlled by an oil company. Waorani are meant to lively freely."

Showing articles 1 - 10 of 1405 total  |  Page 1 of 141

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